Angel webs

Some people grow flowers in their garden. And vegetables and herbs and things. We grow cobwebs.

We grow some flowers – the nasturtiums that spring up and grow wild every winter for instance – but they’re not nearly so spectacular as the cobwebs.

I’m rather fond of the cobwebs and constantly marvel at their structure and the magical way they catch the light.

Spiderweb1

I’d really like to know what motivates the spiders to weave their webs on some objects and not others. Take a look at these for instance:

Angelwebsandbells

Before the angels came to the garden the spiders loved those bells. Now they ignore them completely. A few, who obviously can’t be accommodated by the angels, attach their webs to nearby twigs.

Webandtwigs1

Webandtwigs2

You’d think twigs would be more attractive to a spider, but who am I to question the attraction of angels.

It’s not as though the webs seem to trap insects … though they’re very good at catching leaves. Maybe the angels invited the spiders to spin around them because they like being surrounded by heavenly light when the webs catch the afternoon sun.

Haloweb

Webandchimes

The webs are getting a bit unruly now and the angels are almost hidden by the trapped leaves, so perhaps I’ll brush them away and let the spiders start anew. Give them something to do. It must be pretty boring just sitting there under an angel’s skirt.

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